Can hate be forgiven?

The internet these days is full of people mouthing off, calling out, refusing to apologize, and on occasion, seeking forgiveness, lotsa drama and no shortage of trollololing.

Abdullah Hakim Quick, a teacher at the Islamic Institute of Toronto in Scarborough, said in a statement that he is a changed man.
“Many years ago I made hurtful comments against homosexuals for which I have apologized. My views have evolved over the years. I am fully committed to peaceful coexistence and respect among all people,” he said.

No one is under any obligation of course to believe/accept what he says, but if someone seems honestly repentant, is that enough?

There has been a lot of Homo/Islamo-phobia stuff in the news since the shooting in Orlando, plus lots of handwringing over what and who are ultimately responsible… But that is above my pay grade, I think.

Raza said the belief Quick expressed in the video that gay men should die is not found in the the Qur’an. She says the Islamic holy book does not accept “homosexuality,” but it does not condone violence against the gay community, either.

That may be true… Also pretty sure it doesn’t really matter what is or isn’t in your lil book. People always find reasons and excuses for violence, and sometimes they even change their opinion, and believe what they say.

I’m more of an action type myself though. My guess is you won’t see Mr. Quick at Pride any time soon.

2 thoughts on “Can hate be forgiven?

  1. People “being in love” is a real psychotic condition. Homosexual clergy may be love with two opposing muses. The percentage of homosexuals within the various clergies is usually significantly higher than what it is in the population. These inner conflicts, occasionally resulting in self hatred, has been identified as a prime motivator for violence towards the self and towards others.

    Prominent political leaders fall into this same conflicted love category. Think about Russia today. There is a third element in many of the emotionally charged hate outbursts and this is the paternal influence on the self-hater. This should be called the ‘The Mel Gibson Syndrome’.

    Mel’s father’s cantankerous and outspoken support for the pre Vatican 2 dogma is well known. The effect on Mel is obvious. The Orlando shooter had a similar powerful paternal influence. The Female engineering student shooter likewise.

    The hatreds and prejudices, expressed by fathers, seems to be a major factor in the formation of the male version of hatred for self and for others. It’s that old Mel Gibson syndrome.

  2. Edited:
    Tim Underwood on June 24, 2016 at 11:37 am said:

    People “being in love” is a real psychotic condition. Homosexual clergy may be in love with two opposing muses. The percentage of homosexuals within the various clergies is usually significantly higher than what it is in the population. These inner conflicts, occasionally resulting in self hatred, has been identified as a prime motivator for violence towards the self and towards others.

    Prominent political leaders fall into this same conflicted love category. Think about Russia today. There is a third element in many of the emotionally charged hate outbursts and this is the paternal influence on the self-hater. This should be called the ‘The Mel Gibson Syndrome’.

    Mel’s father’s cantankerous and outspoken support for the pre Vatican 2 dogma is well known. The effect on Mel is obvious. The Orlando shooter had a similar powerful paternal influence. The Female engineering student shooter likewise.

    The hatreds and prejudices, expressed by fathers, seems to be a major factor in the formation of the male version of hatred for self and for others. It’s that old Mel Gibson syndrome.

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